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Ecosystem Orchestration Maturity and Capability Matrix

Executive Summary

Innovation Ecosystems are structurally complex, environments inhabited by diverse participants linked by information and value flows. Ecosystems include networks of organizations - suppliers, distributors, customers, competitors, government agencies, and other entities— involved through both competition and cooperation and animated by dynamic new ways of thinking around how ideas can create meaningful shared value for members of the ecosystem.

The Ecosystem Orchestration Maturity and Capability Matrix provides ecosystem participants with an objective measure of their ecosystem maturity and a way to identify what capabilities they still require, as well as an understanding of the maturity of their organization's innovative capabilities. 

The Ecosystem Orchestration Maturity and Capability Matrix outlines five main maturity dimensions of innovation capability:

1. Innovation Ecosystem Orchestration

2. Digital and Physical Infrastructure Enabled

3. Knowledge Optimization and Idea Portfolio Management 

4. Innovation Value Exchange and Commercialization 

5. Open Innovation Culture

 

Criteria

The Ecosystem Orchestration Maturity and Capability Matrix outlines five main categories for enabling digital health infrastructure innovation:

1. Innovation Ecosystem Orchestration

2. Digital and Physical Infrastructure Enabled

3. Knowledge Optimization and Idea Portfolio Management 

4. Innovation Value Exchange and Commercialization 

5. Open Innovation Culture

 

The Capability Matrix functions on a 5-step scale:

1 2 3 4 5
Reactive Enlightened Structured Systematic Continuously Optimizing

Each level refers to the maturity of an organization’s innovation ecosystem and its current capabilities of applying knowledge, resources, stakeholders, and structures towards creation. 

 

1) Innovation Ecosystem Orchestration

 
Innovation Ecosystem Orchestration refers to the ability and approach of an organization to create an internal culture that encourages innovative thinking. Innovative ecosystems in organizations focus on creating new resources and ideas, whereas non-innovative business ecosystems use existing resources limited to their current contexts.
 
 
Level 1: Reactive
 
 
Little or no ecosystem innovation collaboration
 
  • Siloed organizations in the ecosystem with little or no external innovation collaboration (with ecosystem partners, suppliers, customers, etc.)

  • Task oriented Innovation Collaboration
  • Innovation Ecosystem assets and boundaries are unidentified

 

Level 2: Enlightened
 
 
Need for external innovation collaboration with ecosystem partners recognized
 
  • Organizations in the ecosystem recognize the need for external innovation collaboration with ecosystem partners suppliers and have collaboratively created a common vision and a shared strategy linked to organizational corporate strategy 
  • Organizations in the ecosystem have a common definition for innovation
  • Innovation Ecosystem has one or more governance structures to guide shared innovation activities
  • Innovation Ecosystem key assets and boundaries informally identified 

 

 
Level 3: Structured
 
 
Shared innovation roadmap and governance funding
 
  • Organizations in the ecosystem have a shared innovation roadmap and are implementing early external innovation collaboration initiatives identified on it
  • Innovation Ecosystem governance structures collaboratively fund shared innovation activities
  • Ecosystem key assets and boundaries formally identified and communicated to ecosystem innovators 
  • Improved cross organizational collaboration

 

Level 4: Systematic
 
 
Multiple collaborative innovation initiatives
 
  • Organizations in the ecosystem are funding and implementing multiple external innovation collaboration initiatives on the shared innovation roadmap 
  • Open Innovation that includes partners and suppliers to the ecosystem regularly practiced by key organizations
 
Level 5: Continuously Optimizing
 
 
Sustainably financed innovation and international partnerships
 
  • Organizations in the ecosystem have renewed the Innovation roadmap
  • Organizations in the ecosystem have created sustainable financing to fund multiple external innovation collaboration initiatives on the shared innovation roadmap 
  • Open Innovation includes international partners and linkages to other ecosystems

 


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2) Digital and Physical Infrastruture Enabled

Digital and Physical Infrastructure Enabled is defined as the ability to store and exchange data through a centralized communication system. They encompass foundational services that are necessary to the information technology capabilities of organizations and ecosystems.

 

Level 1: Reactive

Interoperable systems or innovation driven data exchange between ecosystem partners largely ignored

  • Interoperable systems or data exchange between ecosystem partners largely ignored
  • Digital health infrastructure for telehealth or virtual care or consumer self care largely ignored
  • No on-demand development sandboxes available to ecosystem partners 
  • No coordination of ecosystem data governance, Identity, authentication, consent, DURSA

 

Level 2: Enlightened

Need for innovation data exchange and systems recognized

  • Ecosystem partners have identified the problems of interoperable systems or data exchange between them
  • No digital health infrastructure for telehealth or virtual care or consumer self care
  • Ecosystem partners use word-of-mouth interoperability best practices 

 

Level 3: Structured

Competency centre for disciplined interoperable systems and data exchange and on demand sandbox

  • Interoperable systems and data exchange for innovation purposes are a recognized discipline
  • Ecosystem partners have identified one or more integration competency centres with formalized best practices
  • Limited on-demand sandbox is available to ecosystem partners 
  • Limited APIs for basic integration available to ecosystem partners (eg: identity, authorization, etc.)
  • Innovators can submit interoperability project requests

 

Level 4: Systematic

Interoperable integrated systems are implemented as a digital enabler of ecosystem innovation

  • Interoperable integrated systems are recognized and implemented as an ecosystem digital enabler
  • Ecosystem support for adaptive requirements
  • Innovators offered facilitation and expertise
  • On-demand sandboxes available to ecosystem partners (mobile, Analytics, AI, Cybersecurity, Clinical Trials, Precision Medicine, Population Health, etc.)
  • Incubators/Accelerators established
  • Ecosystem Managed services and managed API environment available to ecosystem partner

 

Level 5: Continuously Optimizing

Digital Health Infrastructure and multiple sandboxes enable new forms of secure integrated care across partners with built in anonymized data for research and development

  • Multiple comprehensive interoperable systems
  • Integration embedded into the digital culture
  • Integrated Clinical and Business Processes
  • Digital Health Infrastructure allows integrated virtual care across partners and secure, private self care via a civic data trust
  • Comprehensive data governance enables partners to exchange data and use anonymized data for research and development purposes
  • Multiple on-demand sandboxes available to ecosystem partners (mobile, Analytics, AI, Cybersecurity, Clinical Trials, Precision Medicine, Population Health, etc.)
  • Incubators/Accelerators integrated into culture effectively
  • Ecosystem Managed services available to ecosystem partners
  • DIY-integrated services enabled, facilitated, and encouraged

 


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3) Idea Management and Knowledge Optimization

Idea Management and Knowledge Optimization refers to the systems an organization has put in place for sharing knowledge, ideas, information, and resources internally and externally. High-functioning innovative business ecosystems have efficient infrastructure that allow for stakeholders to easily and constantly share and compare information, whereas non-innovative organizations

 

Level 1: Reactive

Limited knowledge management and manual idea collection

  • Knowledge management limited to specific organizations and to research 
  • Limited knowledge sharing structures to share knowledge with partners
  • No idea collection systems
  • No ecosystem registry to identify ecosystem subject matter experts
  • Partner specific impact metrics, no ecosystem metrics

 

Level 2: Enlightened

Need for ecosystem knowledge management and communities of practice recognized

  • Need for Ecosystem Communities of Practice identified
  • Ecosystem partners have identified the problems of ecosystem knowledge management and transfer between them
  • Limited digital knowledge sharing platforms or infrastructure 
  • Limited shared registries and analytics systems (ecosystem genomics, images, anonymized data warehouses, etc.) 
  • Ecosystem partners use word-of-mouth best practices

 

Level 3: Structured

Ecosystem accessible knowledge exchange implemented

  • Ecosystem accessible knowledge exchange systems are implemented as a ecosystem innovation enabler
  • At least one shared registry or analytics system available to innovators (ecosystem genomics, images, anonymized data warehouses, etc.)
  • Ecosystem support for knowledge management requirements
  • Innovators offered best practice knowledge and expertise
  • Idea portfolio management platform implemented in early use

 

Level 4: Systematic

Multiple collaborative innovation initiatives

  • Innovation process driven knowledge management promotes Ecosystem learning
  • Knowledge repositories are used to create and enhance the innovation culture
  • Intellectual property protected
  • Ebb and flow of relevant non-proprietary knowledge exists with external partners
  • Ecosystem partners have identified and agreed on common Ecosystem Impact metrics and measurements
  • Idea portfolio management platform implemented in regular use
  • Portfolio of innovations is collected and managed
  • Ecosystem partners know how to access market insights and competitive intelligence

 

Level 5: Continuously Optimizing

Sustainably financed innovation and international partnerships

  • Comprehensive knowledge sharing structures and content regularly shared 
  • Identified communities of practice in strategic areas for the ecosystem operating as a learning health ecosystem that shares relevant information with external parties
  • Portfolios of ideas, proposals, projects and companies collected, tracked and measured and shared across ecosystem partners
  • Ecosystem Impact metrics and measurements are known, collected and reported
  • Comprehensive knowledge architecture (data, information, knowledge, impact metrics, etc.)
  • Ecosystem innovators regularly use market insights and competitive intelligence to drive innovation decision making

 


4) Innovation Value Exchange and Commercialization

Innovation Value Exchange and Commercialization refers to the way in which companies monetize and commercialize their innovation products, as well as the sales transaction between innovation ecosystems and clients and stakeholders.

Level 1: Reactive

Limited ecosystem financing and commercialization

  • Limited financing categories available
  • No commercialization capabilities
  • No Business Advisory (accounting, tax, legal, marketing,investment, etc.) available
  • No business support services or Design and Development capabilities available to ecosystem
  • No orchestrated value exchange between partners
  • Partner specific intellectual property arrangements are uncoordinated and stifle ecosystem collaboration and innovation

 

Level 2: Enlightened

Need for ecosystem graduated financing and commercialization capabilities recognized

  • Organizations in the ecosystem have a common definition for innovation value exchange, early use cases identified governance structures to guide common value realization
  • Organizations in the ecosystem recognize the need for ecosystem impact metrics and have collaboratively created a common measurement framework
  • Awareness of graduated financing across ecosystem
  • Plan for Commercialization capabilities
  • Importance of innovation friendly Intellectual Property arrangements understood, with a plan in place

 

Level 3: Structured

Examples of non monetary value exchange and benefit realization in collaborative innovation initiatives

  • Ecosystem partners have piloted examples of non-monetary value exchange in collaborative innovation initiatives
  • Ecosystem partners can describe an instance of non-monetary benefit realization from shared investment
  • Ecosystem partners have acquired a platform or service for innovators to obtain new forms of communal value exchange
  • Financing available sporadically across ecosystem
  • Limited Commercialization capabilities in strategic areas available (eg: regulatory compliance for strategic focus where that is required)
  • Business Advisory (accounting, tax, legal, marketing,investment, etc.)  available
  • No business support services or Design and Development capabilities available to ecosystem partners

 

Level 4: Systematic

Graduated financing with non monetary value exchange and benefit realization and commercialization services available across ecosystem

  • Graduated financing with non-monetary value exchange and benefit realization available across ecosystem
  • Business Advisory (accounting, tax, legal, marketing,investment, etc.) readily available
  • Business Advisory and Business support services (accounting, tax, legal, marketing, etc.) readily available to ecosystem participants
  • Design and Development commercialization capabilities available to ecosystem partners

 

Level 5: Continuously Optimizing

Regular access to value exchange platforms and services and orchestrated value exchange

  • Ecosystem Innovators have ongoing regular access to value exchange platforms and services (blockchain, cryptocurrencies, crowdfunding, outcome driven philanthropy, etc.) to accelerate innovations
  • Ecosystem has orchestrated value exchange coordinated between partners, beneficiaries and stakeholders
  • Value exchange network is expanding with new partners and new business models for innovators
  • Graduated financing available across ecosystem from idea grants to prototyping to commercialization scaling
  • Ecosystem partners know of successful ecosystem commercialization projects and exits
  • Return on equity reported

 


5) Open Innovation Culturesd

An Open Innovation Culture is the culture within an organization that encourages and systematizes innovative thinking and collaboration, as well as risk-taking. Failure is considered a necessary, even valuable, element to Open Innovation Cultures.

Level 1: Reactive

Siloed organizations with no support for risk taking or failure

  • Siloed organizations with little or no external collaboration (with ecosystem partners, suppliers, customers, etc.)
  • Task-oriented collaboration
  • No support for risk taking or room for failure

 

Level 2: Enlightened

Senior executives in key ecosystem organizations assigned to drive ecosystem innovation

  • Senior executives in key ecosystem organizations assigned to drive ecosystem innovation

 

Level 3: Structured

Visible executive support for ecosystem risk taking and project failure with learning is tolerated

  • Visible executive support for ecosystem risk taking and project failure with learning is tolerated

 

Level 4: Systematic

Ecosystem learning system encourages risk taking

  • Ecosystem learning system encourages risk taking and project failure with learning is tolerated

 

Level 5: Continuously Optimizing

Ecosystem has built in learning loops to harvest learnings

  • Ecosystem has built in learning loops that harvest learnings
  • Innovators take risks
  • Innovators who fail are recognized and valued and do not have their careers penalized

sd

Global Collaborative Innovation Community

Participation in an innovation ecosystem and related activities should be documented within an organizational strategy with clear lines of accountability and ownership regarding implementation, evaluation and sustainability. Idea management systems, such as the Global Collaborative Innovation Community, can be useful mechasims to capture, store, and share ideas for development.

Leadership support and engagement (including the Board of Director's) is critical to ensuring that innovation is a strategic priority. Despite the critical importance of innovation to most companies' ongoing success, many organizations fail to develop sustainable innovation management processes. This is why it is crucial to encourage collaborative idea management to drive continuous innovation in large organizations.


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Further Reading